Resource Library

Click each article to see an abstract which contains a link to the full article.

Library Index

Fact Sheet Series (1-10)

Summary Abstract

  • (1) The Beverly Foundation

    This fact sheet provides information about the Beverly Foundation’s history, its pioneering efforts in senior transportation, its areas of exploration, its main research and demonstration initiatives, its major products through 2008, and its special initiatives undertaken in 2008. The fact sheet also describes the Foundation’s method of leveraging its research and demonstration capacity through partnership projects with national organizations; and its methods of streamlining its activities by mining its considerable database of senior transportation services, using its data to prepare professional and consumer publications, streamlining its annual STAR Search survey and distribution methods, and creating new opportunities for exchange among STPs (Supplemental Transportation Programs for seniors) in America.
    (1) The Beverly Foundation

  • (2) Giving Up The Keys

    This Fact Sheet provides information about a Beverly Foundation qualitative and quantitative research project undertaken in 1999 in cooperation with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the US Department of Transportation, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety and the Eno Foundation.  It reports on twenty-two focus groups undertaken in three states with transportation rich seniors (who drove), transportation dependent seniors (who no longer drove), and transportation concerned community members.  It provides group profiles and participants’ comments about “giving up the keys”.  It also identifies their worries about a future without driving, reviews their observations about options, and includes several universal themes which resulted from the twenty-two focus groups. Finally, the fact sheet introduces the 5 A’s of Senior Friendly Transportation, a concept which was developed as one of the outcomes of the project.
    Related Materials: Transportation for An Aging Society (1999), The 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation, Beverly Foundation Fact Sheet Series, Vol. 2 (4), 2010.
    (2) Giving Up The Keys

  • (3) STPs in America

    This Fact Sheet identifies types of transportation alternatives that can be available to the general population, introduces the concept of supplemental transportation for seniors, provides a profile of STPs from the Beverly Foundation’s database through 2007, details their services and how they support seniors, offers explanations of why they are successful in providing services to older adults, and identifies ten principles on the value of STPs. Of special importance is the profile of 830 STPs that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys from 2000 – 2007. The Fact Sheet includes charts with data on service methods by types of drivers and types of vehicles, top destinations, and service features including availability and types of assistance. It also presents a calculator for measuring the level of senior friendliness of an STP by addressing the 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation.
    Related Materials: series of reports on STAR Search/STAR Awards.
    (3) STPs in America

  • (4) STPs in Rural America

    This Fact Sheet introduces a definition of rural America, the challenges faced by its transportation services in providing transportation to older adults, and methods used by STPs for meeting the needs of senior passengers in rural areas. In addition to providing a profile of the 168 STPs providing service specifically in rural America that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys, the Fact Sheet also references a 2006 report that resulted from a partnership project of the Beverly Foundation and CTAA. Of special importance are the data on service features, service methods, types of drivers, types of vehicles, volunteer drivers, costs per ride comparisons of paratransit and volunteer driver services, and profiles of five STPs. Much of the data in this Fact Sheet can be compared with data presented in STPs in America, Beverly Foundation Fact Sheet Series, vol. 1 (3), 2008.
    Related Materials: Transportation Innovations for Seniors: A Report from Rural America (2006).
    (4) STPs in Rural America

  • (5) The 5 A’s of Senior Friendly Transportation

    This fact sheet summarizes the Beverly Foundation’s 5 A’s of Senior Friendly Transportation. The 5 A’s were identified in quantitative and qualitative research undertaken by the Beverly Foundation in the late 1998 and 1999. Additional information about each of the AÕs was collected in 2004 and 2005 and a calculator was developed in 2008. The 5 A’s include: availability, acceptability, accessibility, adaptability, and affordability. Each A is discussed at length with respect to how it relates to seniors and their ability to use a transportation service. A ‘senior friendliness’ calculator is included in the fact sheet.
    (5) The 5 A’s of Senior Friendly Transportation

  • (6) Volunteer Driver Programs

    This Fact Sheet provides general information and data on volunteer driver programs. It introduces them in the context of volunteer organizations and discusses the main reasons the programs say they were organized: the lack of transportation for seniors or seniors’ inability to access many services; the ability of volunteer driver programs to get seniors where they need to go, to provide them with assistance; and their ability to provide service at a low cost. The fact sheet discusses how these programs are organized, organizations that sponsor them, the assistance they can provide, factors that can allow them to provide services at a low cost, and factors related to risk. Of special importance is the profile of 543 volunteer driver programs that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys from 2000 to 2007. Also presented are five organizational examples of volunteer driver program approaches.
    (6) Volunteer Driver Programs

  • (7) Volunteer Drivers

    This Fact Sheet introduces volunteer drivers as central elements to the American pastime of volunteering while emphasizing their contributions in the context of volunteering their time and driving skills to older adults by participating in driver programs. The data for the fact sheet were gathered in 2004 and 2005 in concert with the Beverly Foundation STAR Search program which, in addition to its survey of volunteer driver programs, asked volunteer drivers themselves to complete a survey on their volunteer experiences. In addition to a profile of the 714 survey respondents, the Fact Sheet discusses why they drive, the assistance they provide, where they go, when they drive, challenges they face, the time they spend, roles they play, and the satisfaction they receive. Of interest is the fact that 63% of the respondents were age 65+ and 54% had been driving fifty years or more.
    Related Materials: Volunteer Drivers in America: The Hope of the Future. A Brief from the Beverly Foundation (2008), 2004 and 2005 reports on STAR Search/STAR Awards.
    (7) Volunteer Drivers

  • (8) Transportation and Dementia

    This Fact Sheet opens with a brief discussion of the challenges of dementia, presents the 10 Warning Signs of Dementia from the Alzheimer’s Association, and outlines issues associated with transportation and dementia. Its contents include Reisburg’s Stages of Alzheimer’s disease, indicators of driving decline associated with dementia, the relationship of dementia to transportation options, and discussed the 10 warning signs of dementia and their impact on the ability of a person with dementia to use transportation options. The fact sheet also discusses the elements of dementia friendly transportation suggesting that “it is the degree of dementia friendliness that will determine whether options will enable a person with dementia to experience a sense of independence, get where they need to go, and enjoy an acceptable quality of life.” The dementia-friendly elements (availability, acceptability, accessibility, adaptability, and affordability) are adapted from the Beverly Foundation’s 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation. A Dementia Friendliness Calculator is included in the fact sheet.
    (8) Transportation and Dementia

  • (9) The TRIP Model

    This fact sheet describes The TRIP Model, sometimes called Òfriends helping friendsÓ model. The original TRIP program was started in Riverside, California. In 1993, its budget was $26,524; it served 96 passengers; it included 114 drivers; it traveled 65,635 miles, and it calculated a cost per ride of $9.50. In 2009 TRIPÕs budget was Ò$496,095; it served 583 passengers; it included 700 volunteer drivers, it served 583 passengers; it traveled 1.4 million miles; and it calculated a cost per ride of $4.96. The programÕs experience and model is organized to empower its passengers to recruit their own drivers and to enable ride scheduling between the rider and driver. Thus, the TRIP model not only empowers passengers, but also promotes efficient and cost-effective operations.
    (9) The TRIP Model

  • (10) STAR Search & STAR Awards

    This Fact Sheet discusses the origin of the Beverly Foundation’s STAR Search survey and its progression into an annual survey. It introduces survey partners and identifies the materials that resulted from the surveys. The Fact Sheet also includes a profile of the 47 unduplicated winners of awards, which provides considerable data such as: represented states, average years in operation, fee structure, driver facts, vehicle facts, and top destinations. A pilot introduced in 2008 which presents a new method of streamlining the STAR Search and Award Program is described, as well as the Beverly Foundation’s planned 2009-2013 STAR Awards Program. The Fact Sheet also includes charts listing the winners of the STAR Awards for Excellence and the STAR Special Recognition Awards from 2000 to 2007, and a separate chart listing the 2008 STAR Award winners.
    Related Materials: series of reports on STAR Search/STAR Award Program.
    (10) STAR Search & STAR Awards

Giving Up The Keys

  • Giving Up The Keys

    This Fact Sheet provides information about a Beverly Foundation qualitative and quantitative research project undertaken in 1999 in cooperation with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the US Department of Transportation, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety and the Eno Foundation.  It reports on twenty-two focus groups undertaken in three states with transportation rich seniors (who drove), transportation dependent seniors (who no longer drove), and transportation concerned community members.  It provides group profiles and participants’ comments about “giving up the keys”.  It also identifies their worries about a future without driving, reviews their observations about options, and includes several universal themes which resulted from the twenty-two focus groups. Finally, the fact sheet introduces the 5 A’s of Senior Friendly Transportation, a concept which was developed as one of the outcomes of the project.
    Related Materials: Transportation for An Aging Society (1999), The 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation, Beverly Foundation Fact Sheet Series, Vol. 2 (4), 2010.
    Giving Up The Keys

  • Transportation in an Aging Society (1999)

    In 1999, the Beverly Foundation, in collaboration with the above sponsors, undertook this research project as part of a national initiative to ensure the safe transportation of older adults, with special attention on the future needs of the baby boom generation. Research activities included community forums and twenty-two focus groups in selected sites in California, Florida and Michigan. The input and recommendations that resulted from the community forums and focus groups were used to develop a national agenda and strategic plan for improving transportation in the new millennium. The report includes background information on the project, a description of the methodology, highlights of key themes, and a detailed summary of the focus group discussions and responses of participants to a written survey. Results are organized by three target groups: “transportation rich” seniors (older adults who drove), “transportation dependent” seniors (older adults who no longer drove), and individuals who were “transportation concerned” (family, friends who were caregivers). The appendix includes focus group information by state and target group. Discussion questions, written surveys, recruitment screeners also are included.
    Transportation in an Aging Society (1999)

STPs in America (Supplemental Transportation Programs for seniors)

  • STPs in America Fact Sheet (2008)

    This Fact Sheet identifies types of transportation alternatives that can be available to the general population, introduces the concept of supplemental transportation for seniors, provides a profile of STPs from the Beverly Foundation’s database through 2007, details their services and how they support seniors, offers explanations of why they are successful in providing services to older adults, and identifies ten principles on the value of STPs. Of special importance is the profile of 830 STPs that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys from 2000 – 2007. The Fact Sheet includes charts with data on service methods by types of drivers and types of vehicles, top destinations, and service features including availability and types of assistance. It also presents a calculator for measuring the level of senior friendliness of an STP by addressing the 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation.
    Related Materials: series of reports on STAR Search/STAR Awards.
    STPs in America Fact Sheet (2008)

  • Report on STPs in America (2004)

    These two reports were the result of cooperative efforts between the Beverly Foundation and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. The content of the reports was taken from the initial (2000) STAR Search survey of STPs in America and subsequent STAR Search Surveys through 2003. While the reports include brief summaries of survey methodology, their emphasis is on the results of the surveys including history of the responding organizations; their location; the transportation services they provide; their finances and risk management approaches; and their problems, solutions and contributions. The first report introduces the 5 A’s of senior-friendly transportation and the second report describes the 5 A’s and the potential value of understanding transportation from the perspective of “senior friendliness.”
    The first report (2001) also includes profiles of the Beverly Foundation’s STAR Award winners and six case studies. The second report (2004) is introduces a variety of Concepts and Practices of STPs in America including the dilemma of Transportation Dependency, a Template of Ground Transportation Options, and the STP Model. It also includes a discussion of the PasRide Pilot Project (in Pasadena, CA), STAR Awards winners, and an index of 419 STPs respondents to STAR Search surveys. These reports provide the first survey data of transportation services in America that provide specialized transportation for older adults, and the first glimpse of the organization, management, and service delivery of those organizations.

    Report on STPs in America (2004)
    Report on STPs in America (2001)

  • Report on STPs in America (2001)

    These two reports were the result of cooperative efforts between the Beverly Foundation and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. The content of the reports was taken from the initial (2000) STAR Search survey of STPs in America and subsequent STAR Search Surveys through 2003. While the reports include brief summaries of survey methodology, their emphasis is on the results of the surveys including history of the responding organizations; their location; the transportation services they provide; their finances and risk management approaches; and their problems, solutions and contributions. The first report introduces the 5 A’s of senior-friendly transportation and the second report describes the 5 A’s and the potential value of understanding transportation from the perspective of “senior friendliness.”
    The first report (2001) also includes profiles of the Beverly Foundation’s STAR Award winners and six case studies. The second report (2004) is introduces a variety of Concepts and Practices of STPs in America including the dilemma of Transportation Dependency, a Template of Ground Transportation Options, and the STP Model. It also includes a discussion of the PasRide Pilot Project (in Pasadena, CA), STAR Awards winners, and an index of 419 STPs respondents to STAR Search surveys. These reports provide the first survey data of transportation services in America that provide specialized transportation for older adults, and the first glimpse of the organization, management, and service delivery of those organizations.

    Report on STPs in America (2004)
    Report on STPs in America (2001)

Public Transportation

  • Public Transportation Fact Sheet

    This Fact Sheet presents a 2007 collaborative project and related report from a Beverly Foundation/APTA partnership. The report is based on data collected from a survey of public transportation providers and focus groups with older adults who used public transportation services. The Fact Sheet includes criteria for acceptance of public transportation services, comments from older adults regarding their use of public transportation services, ten recommendations for improving the ability of older adults to access these services, and suggested modifications public transportation services can make to respond to the access challenges faced by older adults. A chart providing information on five public transportation services is included. The chart provides data on budget, ridership, age of senior passengers, special programs for seniors and promising practices transportation services identified in the survey.
    Public Transportation Fact Sheet

  • Public Transportation Programs for Seniors

    This report provides information about the importance of transportation to older adults, examples of what public transportation services are doing to meet their transportation needs, and data on public transportation services and special programs that serve older adults. The report includes data from survey responses by eighty-eight public transportation programs and twelve case examples of successful programs that support the needs of senior passengers. Ten key finding from the survey are included, two of which identify barriers to serving older adults and obstacles to senior utilization. The results of the survey are also discussed in the context of “senior friendliness”. The case studies discussed the topics of travel training, special destinations, special services, special fares, information and outreach, funding and fundraising, planning and design, and partnerships and coordination. Attachments present topics identified within successful programs, contact information for survey respondents, and a senior friendliness calculator for public and paratransit services.
    Public Transportation Programs for Seniors

  • Transitions to Options (APTA Report – 2007)

    This report is the result of a project which addressed the challenges older people experience when they stop driving and methods for easing the transition from driving to non-driving. Research methods included focus groups, one-on-one interviews, and written surveys with drivers and non-drivers. An expert panel composed of researchers, policymakers, and administrators in the fields of transportation and aging was convened to discuss the results of the field research and to identify future research activities. New insights which emerged from the research and discussions include: difficulties of giving up the keys, traumas associated with no longer driving, challenges of identifying appropriate options before stopping to drive, and transitions to options. Two important recommendations are: to change the negative nature of messages about no longer driving and about making the transition to options, and to identify possible target audiences and intervention strategies that could encourage the use of transportation options. Suggestions for further research include: how internal decisions versus external requirements affect the transition to giving up the keys; intervention points where instrumental assistance such as information and training would be most helpful; and coping strategies for successful transitions.
    Transitions to Options (APTA Report – 2007)

  • Innovations for Seniors

    Undertaken in 2003, the focal point of this project was a national survey to identify, document, and disseminate information regarding innovations used by public and community transit services to meet the needs of senior passengers. 167 surveys were sent to community transit services in 50 states. Responses were received from 33 states with a response rate of 57%. The report includes survey results related to challenges such as difficulties associated with driving, availability of transportation services, access to vehicles, assistance at the destination, and meeting the needs of people with memory loss. Innovations were defined as a change from the norm or standard way of doing things, and numerous innovations for meeting transportation challenges are introduced. In order to further clarify the discussion of innovative methods, the report also includes six case studies, each of which details a problem, an innovative solution, and an outcome. The case studies were undertaken with the Council on Aging & Human Services (COAST) of Colfax, WA, Community Association for Rural Transportation, Inc. (CARTS) of Harrisonburg, VA; Seniors’ Resource Center (SRC) of Denver CO; St. John’s County Council on Aging of St. Augustine, Fl; Special Transit of Boulder, CO; and SMART of Detroit, MI.
    Innovations for Seniors

Rural Transportation

  • Fact Sheet

    This Fact Sheet introduces a definition of rural America, the challenges faced by its transportation services in providing transportation to older adults, and methods used by STPs for meeting the needs of senior passengers in rural areas. In addition to providing a profile of the 168 STPs providing service specifically in rural America that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys, the Fact Sheet also references a 2006 report that resulted from a partnership project of the Beverly Foundation and CTAA. Of special importance are the data on service features, service methods, types of drivers, types of vehicles, volunteer drivers, costs per ride comparisons of paratransit and volunteer driver services, and profiles of five STPs. Much of the data in this Fact Sheet can be compared with data presented in STPs in America, Beverly Foundation Fact Sheet Series, vol. 1 (3), 2008.
    Related Materials: Transportation Innovations for Seniors: A Report from Rural America (2006).
    Fact Sheet

  • Transportation Innovations for Seniors: A Report on Rural America (2006)Click here for a synposis.

    This project explored the innovations methods for addressing the challenges of providing transportation to seniors in rural America. Research activities included structured interviews with fifty-two nationally recognized policy makers, technical advisors, and transit and aging service providers, and five case studies. The report includes a discussion of the rural environment; transportation needs, services, gaps, and challenges particular to rural areas; and solutions and innovations for meeting the needs of senior passengers who use rural transportation services. In addition to discussing the definition of and specific innovations, the report includes a typology of innovations which includes: the point of origin, an idea factory, people markers, and a receptive culture. The underpinnings of the typology and of the ability to promote innovation are identified as leadership and change. The five on-site case studies mentioned above were undertaken with transportation services that exemplified innovative solutions to address the challenges of providing transportation to seniors in rural areas. The services were: Prairie Hills Transit (Spearfish, SD); York County Community Action Corp. Transportation Program (Sanford, ME); OATS (Columbia, MO), Sedgwick County Transportation Brokerage (Wichita, KS), and CARTS (Austin, TX).
    Transportation Innovations for Seniors: A Report on Rural America (2006)Click here for a synposis.

Volunteer Driver Programs

  • Volunteer Driver Programs

    This Fact Sheet provides general information and data on volunteer driver programs. It introduces them in the context of volunteer organizations and discusses the main reasons the programs say they were organized: the lack of transportation for seniors or seniors’ inability to access many services; the ability of volunteer driver programs to get seniors where they need to go, to provide them with assistance; and their ability to provide service at a low cost. The fact sheet discusses how these programs are organized, organizations that sponsor them, the assistance they can provide, factors that can allow them to provide services at a low cost, and factors related to risk. Of special importance is the profile of 543 volunteer driver programs that responded to the Beverly Foundation STAR Search surveys from 2000 to 2007. Also presented are five organizational examples of volunteer driver program approaches.
    Volunteer Driver Programs

  • Volunteer Drivers

    This Fact Sheet introduces volunteer drivers as central elements to the American pastime of volunteering while emphasizing their contributions in the context of volunteering their time and driving skills to older adults by participating in driver programs. The data for the fact sheet were gathered in 2004 and 2005 in concert with the Beverly Foundation STAR Search program which, in addition to its survey of volunteer driver programs, asked volunteer drivers themselves to complete a survey on their volunteer experiences. In addition to a profile of the 714 survey respondents, the Fact Sheet discusses why they drive, the assistance they provide, where they go, when they drive, challenges they face, the time they spend, roles they play, and the satisfaction they receive. Of interest is the fact that 63% of the respondents were age 65+ and 54% had been driving fifty years or more.
    Related Materials: Volunteer Drivers in America: The Hope of the Future. A Brief from the Beverly Foundation (2008), 2004 and 2005 reports on STAR Search/STAR Awards.
    Volunteer Drivers

  • Volunteer Drivers in America: The Hope of the Future (2008)

    While this brief discusses the general topic of volunteerism in America (its local focus, rates of involvement, types of activities and older adult involvement), it also introduces three themes related to senior transportation: (1) the importance of mobility to older adults; (2) special conditions of the “old old”, and (3) the challenges older adults present to traditional transportation services. However, the brief’s central themes are the contributions, motivations, and satisfactions of volunteers who drive older adults. It emphasizes data from the Beverly Foundation’s 2004 and 2005 national surveys of volunteer drivers. In addition to volunteer driver demographics, data are provided on the driving experience; the types of people who drive; what driving means to them; the types of contributions they make to organizations, passengers, and communities they serve (such as time, assistance, vehicles, socialization, and financial savings); their motivations (why they volunteer to drive); the satisfaction they receive (helping people, feeling needed, getting to know riders, donating time and money); and clues to their success. The brief concludes with a summary of how volunteer drivers supplement what others cannot do, promote volunteerism, bring experience and expertise, make a variety of contributions, and advance volunteerism and volunteer driver programs in America.
    Volunteer Drivers in America: The Hope of the Future (2008)

  • The ABC’s of Being An Effective Volunteer Driver: A Tip Book (2007)

    The Volunteer Driver Tip Book was developed in conjunction with Independent Living Partnership’s TRIP volunteer driver program. The tip book is a resource for volunteer drivers to hone the various skills they tap into in the course of their work. Following a classic alphabet format, each letter presents a term relevant to volunteer driving. The tip book includes the following topics. The Tip Book also includes links to additional resources on the internet.
    The ABC’s of Being An Effective Volunteer Driver: A Tip Book (2007)

  • Volunteer Driver Recruitment: An Idea Book For Action (2006)

    Volunteer Driver Recruitment: An Idea Book for Action is a product of the 2005 STAR Search survey, an annual survey conducted by the Beverly Foundation. In 2005 the STAR Search surveys targeted STPs which rely on the services of volunteer drivers. Survey respondents were asked to submit their creative strategies for recruiting volunteer drivers. The Idea Book originated from the responses of 140 participating programs. The Idea Book presents various methods and strategies for recruiting volunteer drivers. Elements include the types of people whom organizations should be targeting as volunteer drivers, the communication tools that proved the most effective in recruiting drivers, and the venues used to approach potential drivers. In addition to methods and strategies, the Idea Book includes summaries of the volunteer driver recruitment plans of the five winners of the 2005 STAR Awards for Excellence. The five recruitment plans were developed by the following organizations: Aging Services, Inc (Cedar Rapids, IA); Encinitas Out and About Transportation Program (Encinitas, CA); S.T.A.R. (O’Fallon, MO); Valley Program for Aging Services (Waynesboro, VA); and VINE Faith in Action (Mankato, MN).
    Volunteer Driver Recruitment: An Idea Book For Action (2006)

  • Risk Management in Volunteer Driver Programs (2006)

    This review of risk management challenges and strategies was prepared by the Beverly Foundation at the request of AARP. It introduces three ways volunteer driver programs fill community gaps (providing rides to people who need them, offering opportunities for drivers to serve their neighbors, and supplementing transportation services in the community). It also makes the case that the positive contributions of volunteer driver program sponsors may diminished or erased altogether if people or properties are harmed as a result of their transportation delivery actions or those of their volunteer drivers. The paper includes five sections. Part 1 addresses risk management practices. Part 2 introduces risk factors related to transportation service delivery, including a continuum of risk factors for traditional and supportive (volunteer driver) transportation services. Part 3 discusses risk management strategies and describes strategies used by four volunteer driver programs. Part 4 provides examples of volunteer driver programs and their exemplary risk management practices in five key areas. Part 5 outlines recommendations for action and lists five valuable resource materials.
    Risk Management in Volunteer Driver Programs (2006)

  • Stories From The Road: Stories From The Heart (2005) (abstract only)

    Stories from the Road was result of a Beverly Foundation STAR Search survey of 244 volunteer drivers, who as part of their survey response told stories about their volunteer driver experience. The seventy-five plus stories included in the book were selected as “the best of the best” submissions from the volunteer driver respondents. The book supplements the stories with general information about senior transportation and volunteer drivers, and includes photographs of many of the volunteer drivers and their riders, as well as information about the three award winning stories. Individually, the stories offer a glimpse at the roles of a volunteer driver. As a whole, they weave what one reader described as “a tapestry of human lives enhanced by a need presented and a service delivered.” Happily, they undermine much of the “common knowledge” about volunteer drivers concerns about liability and insurance, expense related to driving, the burden of commitment, and the difficulty of finding time to drive. For the most part, the drivers tell stories that describe their experiences as opportunities – to help and support and listen and laugh; and their contributions as helping people who, through no fault of their own, need someone to drive them so they can get where they need to go. Many of them say that they, the volunteer drivers, are the ones who really benefit. Stories from the Road can be purchased on www.amazon.com.

The TRIP Model

  • The TRIP Model

    This Fact Sheet discusses the needs of older adults for transportation assistance, ten challenges faced by public and community transportation services in providing that assistance, and provides highlights of the age group that is in most need of assistance. It also includes a discussion of those who provide assistance, and provides a description of five types of transportation assistance for seniors including: gentle support, physical support, activity support, personal support, and special support.
    A central feature of the Fact Sheet is s a chart which includes data on five programs that illustrate different types of assistance and provides a brief discussion of each program. It also presents a calculator for measuring the level of physical assistance that can be made available to passengers by drivers, escorts, family members, friends, neighbors, and caregivers. Assistance types include: gentle assistance, physical assistance, activity assistance, personal assistance, and special assistance.
    The TRIP Model

  • The TRIP Model Brochure

Transportation Assistance

  • Transportation Assistance for Seniors Fact Sheet

    This Fact Sheet discusses the needs of older adults for transportation assistance, ten challenges faced by public and community transportation services in providing that assistance, and provides highlights of the age group that is in most need of assistance. It also includes a discussion of those who provide assistance, and provides a description of five types of transportation assistance for seniors including: gentle support, physical support, activity support, personal support, and special support. A central feature of the Fact Sheet is s a chart which includes data on five programs that illustrate different types of assistance and provides a brief discussion of each program. It also presents a calculator for measuring the level of assistance that can be made available to passengers by drivers, escorts, family members, friends, neighbors, and caregivers.
    Transportation Assistance for Seniors Fact Sheet

  • How To Establish and Maintain Door-Through-Door Transportation Assistance for seniors (2005)

    In 2005, the US Administration on Aging contracted with WESTAT to prepare a “How-To-Guide” for providing door-through-door transportation services to older adults. The guide provides the accompanying description of five levels of assistance. The guide includes alternative models of door-through-door services, case studies of door-through-door services, and suggestions on how to get started in providing door-through-door services. The guide also provides answers to frequently asked questions (such as how to handle risks, how to find drivers and other staff, and how to determine financial resources that might be needed). It also includes additional publications, useful websites, information from twenty-two case reviews, and supportive information on risk management and insurance.
    How To Establish and Maintain Door-Through-Door Transportation Assistance for seniors (2005)

  • Transportation and Dementia Fact Sheet

    This Fact Sheet opens with a brief discussion of the challenges of dementia, presents the 10 Warning Signs of Dementia from the Alzheimer’s Association, and outlines issues associated with transportation and dementia. Its contents include Reisburg’s Stages of Alzheimer’s disease, indicators of driving decline associated with dementia, the relationship of dementia to transportation options, and discussed the 10 warning signs of dementia and their impact on the ability of a person with dementia to use transportation options. The fact sheet also discusses the elements of dementia friendly transportation suggesting that “it is the degree of dementia friendliness that will determine whether options will enable a person with dementia to experience a sense of independence, get where they need to go, and enjoy an acceptable quality of life.” The dementia-friendly elements (availability, acceptability, accessibility, adaptability, and affordability) are adapted from the Beverly Foundation’s 5 A’s of Senior-Friendly Transportation. A Dementia Friendliness Calculator is included in the fact sheet.
    Transportation and Dementia Fact Sheet

  • Paid Driver Contributions: Delivering Community Transportation Services (2009)

    While considerable information was available on the roles, responsibilities, and contributions of volunteer drivers, very little information had been gathered about the roles, responsibilities, and contributions of paid drivers. This report includes the results of seventy-six community transportation services (72% of which were located in rural areas) to an on-line survey which gathered information documenting the types, and methods of service offered by transportation systems that pay their drivers. The outcome was an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of paid drivers to their passengers (especially their senior passengers). The report includes the description of the survey methodology, a profile of the seventy-six respondents, a profile of the drivers (provided by managers and supervisors) and conclusions. The report is especially important in that it: (1) compares paid driver pool characteristics (such as career & retiree, pay, and benefits) with years of service; (2) compares paid driver assistance and support (from curb-to-curb to stay-at-destination assistance) with types and locations of service; (3) compares differences in paid drivers’ salary ranges and years of employment with types of benefits that they receive; and (4) compares differences in vehicles used, types of drivers, and assistance they provide with paid and volunteer drivers. An attachment to the report includes a list of survey respondents.
    Paid Driver Contributions: Delivering Community Transportation Services (2009)

Targeted Survey Reports from STP Exchange

STAR Search and STAR Awards

  • STAR Search & STAR Awards

    This Fact Sheet discusses the origin of the Beverly Foundation’s STAR Search survey and its progression into an annual survey. It introduces survey partners and identifies the materials that resulted from the surveys. The Fact Sheet also includes a profile of the 47 unduplicated winners of awards, which provides considerable data such as: represented states, average years in operation, fee structure, driver facts, vehicle facts, and top destinations. A pilot introduced in 2008 which presents a new method of streamlining the STAR Search and Award Program is described, as well as the Beverly Foundation’s planned 2009-2013 STAR Awards Program. The Fact Sheet also includes charts listing the winners of the STAR Awards for Excellence and the STAR Special Recognition Awards from 2000 to 2007, and a separate chart listing the 2008 STAR Award winners.
    Related Materials: series of reports on STAR Search/STAR Award Program.
    STAR Search & STAR Awards

  • STAR Search & STAR Awards Reports 2000-2010 (abstract only)

    Beginning in 2000, the Beverly Foundation conducted an annual STAR Search Survey and conveyed STAR Awards to selected STAR Search survey respondents. The survey and awards initiative had the purpose of identifying STPs (Supplemental Transportation Programs for seniors) and celebrating excellence in their delivery of transportation services to older adults. The survey was initiated as a mail out inquiry which was advertised through several national networks in aging and transportation. In 2008 the Foundation transitioned to web-based survey, involved numerous national network organizations in aging and transportation and involved a wide range of professionals to review surveys (often referred to as STAR Award applications) and recommend STAR Award recipients.
    In the first ten years of undertaking STAR Search surveys, close to 1,300 unduplicated STPs were identified and a host of technical products were developed, many of which are located on the Beverly Foundation website. In the first ten years of making STAR Awards, the Foundation conveyed 97 awards ranging from $500 to $10,000. In 2004, the Foundation began preparing reports which detailed the STAR Search survey methodology and the STAR Award recipients. Each report includes survey data, names and descriptions of award winners, and suggestions for next step actions. For more information see STAR Search/STAR Awards Reports (2004 – 2010) on the Beverly Foundation website.

  • Report on STAR Search 2011
  • Report on STAR Awards 2011
  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2010

    Focus: services for seniors with dementia, services for seniors in rural America, and business practices in senior transit services

  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2009
  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2008
  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2007

    Special Focus: Faith in Action Transportation for Seniors

  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2006

    Special Focus: STPs in California

  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2005

    Special Focus: Volunteer Driver Programs

  • Report on STAR Search/STAR Awards 2004

    Special Focus: Volunteer Driver Programs

Resource Materials

  • Matching/Mentor Workbook (2011)
  • How to Meet Operational Challenges of Providing Transportation to Seniors: A Workbook for Faith in Action Members (2008)

    In 2007, the Beverly Foundation’s STAR search and STAR Awards program targeted members of the Faith in Action network. 225 Faith in Action organizations that provided transportation to older adults responded to the survey. Following analysis of the results of the survey, the Beverly Foundation made a series of recommendations and subsequently prepared a “How to” workbook which dealt with the following ten topics: #1 Design and Service Priorities; #2 Reporting Capacity; #3 Transportation Literacy; #4 Linking Relationships; #5 Multiple Funding Options; #6 Infrastructure Reduction Methods; #7 Transportation Assistance Methods; #8 Attention to Insurance; #9 Volunteer Driver Recruitment; and #10 Senior Friendliness. Attachments include definitions and useful links, results of the 2007 STAR Search Survey and STAR Awards, and a list of survey respondents.
    How to Meet Operational Challenges of Providing Transportation to Seniors: A Workbook for Faith in Action Members (2008)

  • Turn Key Kit: A Web-Based Resource for Volunteer Driver Programs (2005)

    The TurnKey Kit was developed as a no-cost technical assistance tool, and its contents can be downloaded free of charge on the STP Exchange website: www.stpexchange.org. The Kit provides information about how to plan, organize, implement, and evaluate volunteer driver programs. Its special purpose is to support and promote the expansion of volunteer programs that provide transportation to older adults in America. The topics of technical support included in the TurnKey Kit are: the Planning Kit, the Implementation Kit, the Evaluation Kit, and the TRIP Kit (a volunteer driver program model). The informational materials included draw on the research of the Beverly Foundation and the practical, service delivery experience of the TRIP program of the Independent Living Partnership.
    Turn Key Kit: A Web-Based Resource for Volunteer Driver Programs (2005)

  • Transportation Options “How To” Booklet & CD (2003)

    In 2002 the Beverly Foundation developed a booklet of senior transportation options for its local community. It was created because of the Foundation’s belief that in order for transportation services to be available to seniors, seniors must be aware of the types of transportation services that exist. In 2003, the Transportation Options Booklet was redeveloped as a CD and was included in an AoA funded Easter Seals Caregiver Transportation Project. The resulting collaboration between the Beverly Foundation and Easter Seals produced a customizable electronic template (sometimes referred to as a “drop in the facts” CD) that can be used in identifying transportation options that are available to seniors in a typical community. The template provides a framework from which to inventory and assess existing transportation options, gaps and needs, which can then be organized into a community-based transportation options booklet. The electronic template was later adapted to the needs of the United We Ride Program of the Federal Transit Administration. The electronic version of the template is available on the United We Ride website.
    Transportation Options “How To” Booklet & CD (2003)

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